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Nikki Haley says her father died on Father's Day

"I had to say goodbye to the smartest, sweetest, kindest, most decent man I have ever known,” said the former South Carolina governor.
Nikki Haley
Posted at 11:49 AM, Jun 17, 2024

Former South Carolina Gov. Nikki Haley announced that her father Ajit Singh Randhawa died on Father’s Day.

The Republican, who attempted a run for president earlier this year, shared the news on X Sunday.

“This morning, I had to say goodbye to the smartest, sweetest, kindest, most decent man I have ever known,” Haley’s post began, alongside a pic of her hugging her father.

“My heart is heavy knowing he is gone. He taught his kids the importance of faith, hard work, and grace. He was an amazing husband of 64 years, a loving grandfather and great grandfather, and the best father to his four children. He was such a blessing to all of us. Happy Father’s Day Dad. We will miss you dearly,” Haley wrote.

Haley, who is also a former ambassador to the United Nations, did not reveal his cause of death.

In January, ABC News had reported that Haley, then a candidate for president, had briefly paused her campaign to visit her father in the hospital as he suffered from cancer.

Haley had positioned herself as an alternative to former President Donald Trump, but was unable to pick up the support she needed to see her campaign through.

“We need a young, new-generational leader that can go and put in eight years of day-and-night work and get solutions done for the American people," Haley said back in February. "No drama, no vendettas. Just results for the American people.”

In March, Haley suspended her run for the White House, but fell short of endorsing her competitor Trump. Last month however, Haley did say her vote in November will be going to Trump. She acknowledged the former president has “not been perfect,” but called President Joe Biden "a catastrophe."

Haley was born in South Carolina in 1972, after her father emigrated from their native country of India in 1969, according to Politico.