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Tennessee woman donates time to braid kids' hair before start of school year

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Posted at 9:58 AM, Aug 17, 2021
and last updated 2021-08-17 15:54:43-04

NASHVILLE, Tenn. — A single mother of two donated her time to braid kids' hair for free at the start of the school year, a labor of love that takes four to six hours a child and would cost $200-$300, and the response was by the dozens.

During the summer of 2021, Brittany Starks received a surprise that inspired her time for the coming weeks.

"One of the friends and family gave my kids a book bag full of school supplies, and two outfits, and a pair of shoes. So, I was extremely grateful, and I'm like, ‘how can I give back?’ Well, I can braid," she recounted. "I live in the Antioch community, so I'm like, you know, let's just, I'm just going to post it on Hip Antioch [Facebook Page] to see if anybody knows any kids or any parents that need your kids' hair done."

The response was immense as dozens reached out for help.

"It was supposed to be probably like five to seven kids, but I didn't think I was going to get such a big reaction than I did. So, it’s been more, a lot more," said Starks.

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Brittany Starks prepares to braid a young girl's hair as a part of her offer to braid for free at the beginning of the school year in August 2021 in Antioch, Tennessee.

Brittany started braiding kids' hair after work, on the weekends, whenever she could manage the time.

"I had a lady, she had five kids, she was living in a hotel, and she needed her kids' hair done. And I'm like, I kept getting stories like that and I'm like, 'I can't, I can't stop,' and they're like, my friends, like, if you can't do it, why would you ever say, 'I can't, I can't,' I can't not, I can't say no," Starks explained. "Because obviously there are some people that really need it."

She ended up enlisting other braiders to help her with the project, and for several weeks straight, she braided.

"The reason I mostly did it is I'm a single mother. I was a struggling single mother. I've been homeless before," said Starks, "it meant something to give back because giving someone who doesn't have it, can't, can't afford it makes something to make their day. I’ll do it, even if I didn't have the time. I didn't even get to do my own child's hair yet."

Starks said that the project is also about building a child's confidence at the start of the school year.

"I know when I was in school, having my hair done... even if I didn't have the best clothes or anything, that made me feel better, you know, going to school, having my hair done, that made my confidence," explained Starks.

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Brittany Starks begins braiding a young girl's hair as a part of her offer to braid for free at the beginning of the school year in August 2021 in Antioch, Tennessee.

She explained getting one's hair done is part of the Black experience that is not well-known.

"It takes time. It takes materials. It takes patience. Sitting for four hours to get your hair braided, that's sometimes, especially for a child that's... it's a lot because some kids can't sit 30 minutes, so to get your hair braided and to look nice, I mean, the result," said Starks. "So, they get happy after that but sitting, getting your hair combed, especially if you have coarse hair. That hurts."

Starks said she plans to continue the project next year, and she hopes it will inspire others to pay it forward.

"I hope that they will learn to give back also. Community service, you know, feeding someone homeless," Starks stated. "I mean, it goes a long way. A long way. Me being homeless before goes a long way. Just being kind. It helps! Like, you never know what someone's going through."

If you want to help Starks by donating supplies or becoming a braider, contact her on her Facebook page.

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Brittany Starks prepares to braid a young girl's hair as a part of her offer to braid for free at the beginning of the school year in August 2021 in Antioch, Tennessee.

Claire Kopsky at WTVF first reported this story.