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Here's what happens if voters approve Measure B - Newland Sierra

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Posted at 3:47 PM, Feb 18, 2020
and last updated 2020-02-20 17:37:30-05

(KGTV) -- A project that would create thousands of homes in San Diego County is heading to the ballot on March 3.

If approved, Measure B, also known as Newland Sierra, would affirm the San Diego County Board of Supervisors’ unanimous approval of the changes to the general plan.

The project includes 2,135 homes, 60 percent of which would be affordable for working families, according to Kenneth Moore, a spokesperson for the Yes on B campaign. The project would be built just off I-15 next to the cities of Escondido, San Marcos, and Vista.

Newland Sierra also preserves more than 60 percent of the property as permanent open space.

RELATED: Newland Sierra promises to prioritize first-responders for new homes

Currently, the general plan includes only 99 homes and designates as much as two million square feet of commercial property.

If voters do pass Measure B, the permitting process will take 18 to 24 months, according to Moore. It would take another six to seven years to construct the entire project.

Moore says construction on the infrastructure could begin as early as late 2021 or 2022. New homes would then start being sold and under construction by 2024.

If the measure doesn’t get approved, however, Moore says that’s it for Newland Sierra. “Somebody could then move forward with the development of the current general plan zoning that allows a massive commercial development and estate homes," Moore says.

RELATED: Developer pushes to rally support for vote on large North County housing development

“Voting Yes on Measure B would create affordably priced homes for working families with open space, parks and trails - a better choice than the current General Plan that permits a two million square foot mega-commercial development, mansions and parking lots,” said Moore.

Still, those in opposition say the project would create wildfire dangers, noise pollution, and traffic congestion.

Much of the opposition is also being led by the neighboring Golden Door resort. "The developer stands to make more than a billion dollars, and the vast majority of homes will require a six-figure salary to afford," said a spokesperson in a statement to 10News.