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Doctor: There could be more E. coli cases from San Diego County Fair

San Diego County Fair
Posted at 5:20 PM, Jul 01, 2019
and last updated 2019-07-01 20:57:38-04

SAN DIEGO (KGTV) -- New information Monday as doctors keep a close eye out for potentially new E. coli cases at the San Diego County Fair after four fell ill and a two-year-old boy died.

This trip to the fair marks the first ever for a Vista sister and brother

"It was a spur of the moment decision, we have a friend inside and I happen to have the day off so we came on over," said Jaime Costa.

But the experience will be missing a fair staple, interacting with livestock and visiting the petting zoo.

The health department has linked 4 cases of E. coli to animal contact.

RELATED: Family mourns toddler dead after E. Coli exposure at San Diego County Fair

"I've been here lots of times as a child and wanted my kids to have that experience, we didn't plan on going near the animals anyway, go to the rides, maybe have some fair food."

Fair officials have removed the animals people could interact with and sanitized those areas.

Jaime Costa says in the future they'll be extremely careful.

"We've done at safari park and various fairs, never thought about it, we wash hands but never thought of something like that happening."

"I would expect more cases to come forward."

RELATED: Two-year-old boy dead, three sickened due to E. Coli linked to San Diego County Fair

Dr. Eric McDonald with the county says since news of the E. coli broke, pediatric patients going to the emergency room doubled over the weekend, but there were no new cases.

"Don't generally recommend getting tested if you don't have symptoms, if you do develop symptoms should go see a physician.”

If a child is showing symptoms, hydration is the most important step.

What could make things worse, on the other hand, are antibiotics and anti-diarrhea medicine - both could increase the risk of complications.

"Alright enjoy the rest of your day folks, thanks for coming."

Health officials say that children under five are at a higher risk of developing complications with E. coli.