NewsNational

Actions

Contents in e-cigarettes could cause heart problems, study finds

Posted: 8:23 PM, Nov 12, 2019
Updated: 2019-11-13 08:12:22-05
Contents in e-cigarettes could cause heart problems, study finds

Although many consider vaping a less harmful alternative to traditional cigarettes, researchers from the Ohio State University say it is not a good to make such claims at this time.

Part of the reason is that research led by OSU Professor of Nursing and Medicine Loren Wold claims that there is growing evidence that e-cigarettes and their aerosol constituents, nicotine, carbonyl compounds, particulate matter, metals and flavorings can have adverse effects on the cardiovascular system.

The study was published last week in journal Cardiovascular Research.

The authors of the study say, however, that there is not sufficient data to make conclusions on the exact effect e-cigarettes have on the heart.

"Great caution and hesitation should remain concerning e-cigarette use until its health risk profile is better established," the study reads. "Therefore, additional high-quality randomized controlled trials are needed to conclusively establish the safety and efficacy of e-cigarettes."

“Many people think these products are safe, but there is more and more reason to worry about their effects on heart health,” Wold said.

The research comes as federal and state officials have been looking into why there has been an increase to the number of vapers who have suffered from lung disease due to vaping. As of last week, there have been 39 confirmed deaths and more than 2,000 cases of lung disease likely caused from vaping, the CDC said.

Part of the problem, Wold said, is that the long-term effects of vaping is unknown. In 2011, there were 7 million people who used e-cigarettes. That number has since increased to 41 million.

“We know these problems are seen in these studies looking at the short-term effects of vaping, but that research is inconsistent and the impact of chronic e-cigarette use is an outright mystery. The potential harm to the heart over time is essentially unstudied,” Wold said.

To read more about the study, click here .