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Will Vanessa Guillén's death result in the military changing harassment policy?

#IamVanessaGuillen bill to be introduced in Congress
Will Vanessa Vanessa Guillén's death result in the military changing harassment policy?
Posted at 3:22 PM, Jul 30, 2020
and last updated 2020-07-30 21:23:57-04

Army Specialist Vanessa Guillén murder has captivated the nation.

The body of the 20-year-old was found only weeks ago, but her death is already prompting Congress to debate how harassment is handled in the military.

Vanessa Guillén's Death

There are still a lot of unknowns regarding why Guillén was killed but Army investigators have said it is possible she was a victim of harassment prior to her death.

Guillén's family believes strongly that she was a victim.

In terms of arrests, Cecily Aguilar has been charged with one count of conspiracy to tamper with evidence.

Army Specialist Aaron Robinson killed himself when he was approached by police. Aguilar is Robinson's estranged wife.

#IamVanessaGuillen movement

Across the country online, women have shared their stories of harassment in the military.

The viral movement has raised awareness about the military's sexual harassment policy and prompted a bill to be introduced in Congress.

The legislation would allow women and men in the military to go to an outside investigator when they face harassment instead of going through the chain of command.

"Sometimes they are part of the problem," Chrystal Romero, a retired member of the military, said.

March in Washington

Guillén's family march Thursday, along with hundreds of supporters, on the National Mall to pass the new bill.

The Guillén family also met with President Trump at the White House who said Guillén's death was terrible.

While the legislation does have bipartisan support, it's unclear if Congress will make it a priority and pass it before the election.