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LA County health officials warn of possible measles exposure at LAX

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Posted at 8:07 AM, Jun 08, 2019
and last updated 2019-06-08 11:07:14-04

LOS ANGELES (KGTV/CNS) - A person infected with measles passed through Los Angeles International Airport twice in late May and public health officials are urging anyone who may have been exposed to check their immunization records and report any possible symptoms.

According to the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, the infected person -- who does not live in the area -- passed through LAX twice during the Memorial Day weekend.

Possibly exposure may have occurred:

-- between 9:30 a.m. and 12:30 p.m. May 26 at LAX Terminal 4 at Gate 48B; and

-- between 3:30 and 5:30 p.m. May 28 at the Tom Bradley International Terminal Remote Gate.

Health officials noted that anyone who may have been in those areas may be at risk of developing measles for up to 21 days following exposure.

People who think they may have been exposed were urged to check their immunization history and contact their health care provider by phone, particularly if they are pregnant or have a weakened immune system. People who develop possible symptoms, such as illness with fever or an unexplained rash, should stay home and call their health care provider.

Southern California doctors have been warning the region to watch out for the illness as cases increase across the U.S. this year. In May, CDC officials said the U.S. had already seen its highest amount of measles cases in three decades.

In SoCal, San Diego and Los Angeles have been considered high-risk counties for measles cases.

"Measles is preventable and the way to end this outbreak is to ensure that all children and adults who can get vaccinated, do get vaccinated. Again, I want to reassure parents that vaccines are safe, they do not cause autism. The greater danger is the disease that vaccination prevents," said CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield.

Measles was eliminated in the U.S. in 2000, meaning it was no longer continuously transmitted. So far this year, at least 26 states have seen cases.