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D.C. DAILY: Trump says 'fake' is 'one of the greatest of all terms I've come up with'

Posted: 10:40 AM, Oct 08, 2017
Updated: 2017-10-08 18:19:49Z
Trump takes credit for the word 'fake'
Trump takes credit for the word 'fake'
Trump takes credit for the word 'fake'

(KGTV) -- President Donald Trump is taking credit for creating the word "fake."

"I think one of the greatest of all terms I’ve come up with is ‘fake,'" Trump told Mike Huckabee on his new talk show. 

Trump asserted his claim to coining the word "fake" during a half-hour interview in which he derided media coverage of his administration's relief efforts in Puerto Rico, stoked his clash with San Juan's mayor Carmen Yulín Cruz, and defended his paper towel tossing to Hurricane Maria victims.

"They had these beautiful, soft towels, very good towels. And I came in and there was a crowd of a lot of people, and they were screaming and they were loving everything," Trump said. "I was having fun, they were having fun."

"The cheering was, it was deafening," he told Huckabee. "They [the media] turned down the sound so that you just heard the announcers, 'Donald Trump.' I mean look, the media is fake."

Trump often uses the term "fake news" on his Twitter account and in public remarks to lash out at unfavorable media and news coverage.  The phrase "fake news" came to prominence during the 2016 U.S. presidential election when fictitious news headlines and articles were being shared across the internet and social media.

Huckabee, former Arkansas governor and Republican presidential candidate, seemed to chuckle to himself as the 71-year-old president acknowledged the phrase "fake" may have been previously used. 

"I guess other people have used it perhaps over the years, but I never noticed it and it's a shame," he said.

According to Merriam-Webster, the first known use of the word "fake" was in the 15th century. 

Perhaps he means to be praising himself for using the phrase "fake news" and not actually inventing the word.

Here's what Trump said (watch the video below):

"Look, the media is fake. In the meantime, I'm here. It's sort of amazing.  So, I'm here and I sometimes ask myself, 'How did I ever get here with the horrible, unfair publicity.' And I don't mind, look, it's fair, if I do something wrong, treat me badly. But when we're doing good, it should be fair. The media is...is... really the word -- I think one of the greatest of all terms I've come up with -- is fake. I guess other people have used it perhaps over the years, but I never noticed it and it's a shame. And they [the media] really hurt the country because they take away the spirit of the country."


 

Corker hits back after Trump’s critical tweets

(AP) -- Sen. Bob Corker is hitting back against President Donald Trump after a series of Trump tweets attacked the Tennessee Republican.

It’s an extraordinary back-and-forth bashing on social media between a Republican president and a senator from his own party.

Here’s what Corker is saying: “It’s a shame the White House has become an adult day care center. Someone obviously missed their shift this morning.”

Trump tweeted that he expected Corker to be an obstacle to the White House agenda’s and charged that Corker “didn’t have the guts to run” for re-election in 2018.

Trump accused Corker of being “largely responsible for the “horrendous” nuclear deal with Iran. But it was the Obama administration that negotiated that agreement.

 


 

Calif. Democrat Feinstein hints at Senate re-election run

WASHINGTON (AP) — California Democrat Dianne Feinstein is giving her strongest hints so far that she’s going to seek a fifth full Senate term in 2018.

She tells NBC’s “Meet the Press” that “I’m ready for a good fight. I’ve got things to fight for.”

Feinstein is age 84 — and is the oldest current senator.

She’s been publicly noncommittal about a 2018 run, and when she was asked in a recent television interview whether she was “up for another six years,” she replied: “Well, we will see, won’t we.”

But Feinstein is telling NBC that she’s “in a position where I can be effective, and hopefully that means something to California.”

Feinstein, who had a pacemaker implanted in January, joined the Senate in 1992 after winning a special election.