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DC Daily: President Trump blasts media in light of CNN story retraction

Posted: 8:05 AM, Jun 27, 2017
Updated: 2017-06-27 15:05:08Z

What's happening in the political world:

Trump criticizes media again in light of story retraction
-- President Trump slammed "Fake News" CNN after three network journalists resigned following the retraction of a Russia-related story.

Trump tweeted Tuesday morning:

CNN published the story on their website Thursday, but it was removed the next day.

The story's writer, an editor with CNN's investigative unit and the unit's leader resigned, the network announced Monday.

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Questions remain after SCOTUS travel ban decision
-- The U.S. Supreme Court Monday announced it would hear President Trump's travel ban case in October, but the court also said parts of the president's order can take effect .

Under the revised travel order, citizens from six Muslim-majority nations can enter the U.S. if they have what the Supreme Court calls a "bona fide" link to the U.S.

For example, students accepted to U.S. universities and an employee who has accepted a job with a company in the U.S. can enter the country.

The ban bars people from Iran, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen from entering the U.S. for 90 days -- outside of the "bona fide" relationship exception.

Homeland Security officials have not confirmed when the ban would begin.


Scathing report, GOP defections plague Senate health bill
-- White House officials pushed back after the Congressional Budget Office released a troubling report on the Senate Republican's plan to replace Obamacare.

The CBO report forecasts 22 million more Americans would be uninsured by 2026 compared to the Affordable Care Act.

White House officials issued this statement following the release of the report:

The CBO has consistently proven it cannot accurately predict how healthcare legislation will impact insurance coverage. This history of inaccuracy, as demonstrated by its flawed report on coverage, premiums, and predicted deficit arising out of Obamacare, reminds us that its analysis must not be trusted blindly. In 2013, the CBO estimated that 24 million people would have coverage under Obamacare by 2016. It was off by an astounding 13 million people – more than half—as less than 11 million were actually covered. Then, CBO estimated that 30 million fewer people would be uninsured in 2016, but then it had to reduce its estimate to 22 million, further illustrating its inability to present reliable healthcare predictions.

We know the facts. To date, we have seen average individual market premiums more than double and insurers across the country opting out of healthcare exchanges. As more and more people continue to lose coverage and face fewer healthcare choices, President Trump is committed to repealing and replacing Obamacare, which has failed the American people for far too long.

Meanwhile, six Republican senators have publicly come out against the Senate plan, which would eliminate Medicaid expansion, drop the coverage mandate and allow insurers to charge older policyholders more.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell has said he was hoping the bill would pass the Senate this week.


CNN contributed to this report