DC Daily: Backlash continues over Trump's WWE tweet

What's happening in the political world:

Trump continues to face criticism over CNN tweet
-- President Trump continues to take heat over a weekend tweet that expressed his feelings on CNN.

The clip -- an edited version of footage from 2007 of Trump at a WWE event -- shows the president wrestling a man with the CNN logo over his face.

Homeland Security Advisor Thomas Bossert defended Trump, saying the president was just fighting back against unfair treatment.

In response to the clip, CNN said it's a "sad day when the President of the United States encourages violence against reporters."

Trump once again targeted "fake news" in a tweet on Monday morning:


Twitter: Trump's WWE tweet doesn't violate rules
-- The president's latest anti-media tweet does not violate Twitter's rules.

Twitter told CNN on Sunday that the company reviewed the tweet, which features a WWE video that has been edited to show Trump beating up a man with a CNN logo on his face.

Twitter said it considered three factors: the political context of the conversation surrounding the tweet, the various ways it could be interpreted and the lack of details in the tweet itself.

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Poll shows civility down since Trump's election
-- The majority of Americans -- seven in 10 -- say the level of civility in Washington has declined since Donald Trump was elected President of the United States, a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll finds.

More than eight in 10 Democrats say the civility of discourse has gotten worse since Trump's election, and 65% of Republicans say civility between their party and the Democrats has declined during the same time period.

Seventy percent of independents share the same view.

Only 6% of Americans believe the overall tone has improved in Washington since Trump was elected, according to the poll, which was conducted before Trump's WWE tweet. Twenty percent of those polled said civility is the same as it was prior to Trump's election.

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CNN contributed to this report

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