News

Actions

Judge grants preliminary approval of settlement in USC gynecologist lawsuits

USC university of southern california campus
Posted at 4:42 PM, Jun 13, 2019
and last updated 2019-06-13 19:42:54-04

LOS ANGELES (CNS) - A federal judge in Los Angeles Thursday gave preliminary approval to a $215 million class-action settlement with women who claim they were sexually abused by former USC campus gynecologist Dr. George Tyndall.

"We are pleased that the court has granted preliminary approval," according to a joint statement from the plaintiffs' lawyers. "This settlement gives every single woman who saw Tyndall a choice in how they want to participate and hold USC accountable, while also forcing the school to change to ensure this doesn't happen again. The judge's order is an important step toward providing each survivor the relief and measure of closure she deserves, and we look forward to obtaining final approval."

UC Interim President Wanda M. Austin issued a statement saying the preliminary approval of the settlement "is a very important step forward in healing our community. The settlement provides every affected individual the opportunity for a fair and respectful resolution, and it contains additional reforms that will build upon the impactful changes we have already made to strengthen our university."

Tyndall and USC have been sued by hundreds of alleged victims, many of whom claim they were inappropriately fondled or photographed by Tyndall under the guise of gynecological exams. Many have also accused him of making sexually charged comments during the exams.

U.S. District Judge Stephen V. Wilson set a January hearing to discuss finalizing the settlement, under which Tyndall's former patients each would receive minimum payments of $2,500, in addition to being eligible to claim an award of between $7,500 to $250,000, subject to review by a three-member panel.

Beyond the payments, the settlement requires USC to institute a series of administrative changes, including the creation of a position for "an independent women's health advocate" to ensure complaints about improper sexual or racial conduct are investigated.

USC also must conduct background checks on health center employees that delve into prior history of sexual harassment allegations, in addition to improving staff training and bolstering staffing so that female students have the option of seeing a female doctor.

The class includes as many as 17,000 women seen by Tyndall at the USC Student Health Center between Aug. 14, 1989, and June 21, 2016, whose treatment included an examination of their breast or genital areas by the physician.