Miami self-imposes 2012 bowl ban

School still under investigation by NCAA

The University of Miami announced Monday it had imposed a postseason bowl ban for the second straight season.

The Hurricanes felt the move was in the best interest of the program pending the ongoing NCAA investigation into a lack of institutional control.

Miami players were informed of the decision Monday, two days after beating South Florida to become bowl eligible. With a win at Duke on Saturday, the Hurricanes would've earned a bid to the ACC title game.

Georgia Tech will replace Miami as the Coastal Division representative in the ACC championship game Dec. 1 against Florida State in Charlotte. The winner of that game is guaranteed a bid to a BCS game.

"Considerable deliberation and discussion based on the status of the NCAA inquiry went into the decision-making process and, while acknowledging the impact that the decision will have on current student-athletes, coaches, alumni and fans, a determination was made that voluntarily withholding the football team from a second postseason was not only a prudent step for the University to take but will also allow for the football program and University to move forward in the most expedited manner possible," Miami said in a news release Monday.

On Nov. 20, 2011, Miami announced it would pass on any bowl invitation as the "right decision" and a necessary measure to protect the integrity of the program and the NCAA's investigation.

Miami had just defeated South Florida 6-3 for its sixth win of the 2011 season.

The focus of the investigation, which became public in August 2011, was former booster and convicted Ponzi scheme ringleader Nevin Shapiro. He told Yahoo Sports that he provided at least 70 football players and recruits "extra benefits" including cars, access to his yacht, cash, strip-club access and prostitutes from 2002 through 2010. Shapiro alleged to contributing to big-name players and current pros who went to Miami.

Shapiro is serving 20 years and reportedly has been interviewed multiple times by the NCAA