High surf, strong currents Monday at San Diego beaches

SAN DIEGO - The strong rip currents and larger than average waves brought to San Diego County's beaches by a south swell over the holiday weekend are expected to ease up tonight, forecasters said.
 
A National Weather Service beach hazards statement will remain in effect through 11 p.m. Monday. The surf is expected to be around 3 to 6 feet with sets to 7 feet, according to the advisory.
 
Forecasters said the strongest rip currents and the highest surf would be along the south-facing beaches in the North County. Rip currents are typically stronger and more frequent near jetties, inlets and piers. Strong longshore currents are also expected to continue.
 
The surf and currents will increase the risk of dangerous swimming conditions -- especially for those with little swimming experience, according to the weather service. Lulls between the sets may catch swimmers off guard.
 
Forecasters said a smaller swell would likely continue to raise the risk for rip currents into mid-week.

Nearly a million San Diegans and visitors flocked to the city's beaches over the holiday weekend, which is typically the busiest of the year.
 
The crowds kept lifeguards busy. San Diego Fire-Rescue Department spokesman Lee Swanson said lifeguards made 468 rescues over the three-day weekend, nearly 250 on Friday.
 
Friday also saw the highest attendance at the beaches -- 459,600 visitors -- along with the most requests for medical aid at 182 and preventative actions taken by lifeguards at 5,745, according to Swanson.
 
Saturday's beach attendance was about 275,000 and authorities conducted nearly 2,000 preventative measures, 107 rescues and responded to 128 medical aid calls. Around 219,000 beachgoers were counted on Sunday, along with 2,424 preventative acts, 123 rescues and 102 medical aid calls, according to Swanson.
 
During last year's Independence Day holiday weekend, more than 1 million people flooded city beaches and 423 rescues were made, authorities said.

Print this article Back to Top

Comments