Chula Vista teacher arrested on child porn charges linked to previous child porn case

John Kinloch taught at Wolf Canyon Elementary

CHULA VISTA, Calif. - Some disturbing new details have emerged concerning a Chula Vista teacher arrested last Friday on child pornography charges.

John Kinloch, a first grade at Wolf Canyon Elementary School, was arrested by the local Internet Crimes Against Children task force and charged with possession of child porn.

In 1998, Kinloch was called on to testify in a child pornography trafficking case in England.

According to the San Diego Reader, Kinloch was offered immunity by the U.S. Attorney's Office in San Diego to go testify against a man named Christopher Wrigley there.

Mitch Dembin, the chief of the general crimes section of the San Diego U.S. Attorney's Office, was quoted at the time saying, "Of the two young men, Wrigley and Kinloch, the Staffordshire police convinced us that Wrigley was clearly the more dangerous."

According to the Reader article, during Kinloch's testimony, he stated he was attracted only to "teenage boys and younger" and admitted he had exchanged pictures of boys as young as 5 with Wrigley.

The two men had struck up a friendship over the Internet.

Fourteen years later, law enforcement officials say the Internet is exactly how Kinloch connected with his young victims.

They say the 41-year-old posed as a 13-year-old girl on the social networking site Meetme.com – among others – to entice boys to send nude photos of themselves.

That anonymity is a huge concern for local parents.

"It's kind of scary," said parent Rekeya Singleton. "You don't know who they're talking to and stuff like that."

Dennis Shaw is the COO of i-Safe, a Carlsbad-based company that teaches schools about Internet safety. He said parents need to get more involved to try to protect their kids but one thing that does not help and can even hurt is trying to take Internet access away.

"The child can get online any place, anytime and anywhere and the parent has no control over that," said Shaw, "Don't build those walls so that when there is a problem, you aren't the person your child comes to."

He said it is okay to set boundaries but that parents need to grow with their kids into the technology starting at an early age.

"They need to make themselves aware of the technology, how to use the technology," said Shaw.

The Chula Vista Elementary School District released the following statement to 10News:

"We were shocked and disappointed to learn of this article from 1998 from the San Diego Reader. We learned about it only today. We now want to know why Kinloch's past was not red-flagged before he was hired in 1999."

Anthony Millican, a spokesman for the Chula Vista Elementary School District, told 10News, "It's alarming. We're very upset about this."

Millican added, "How does someone like this with this kind of background… How does the state of California issue this person a teaching credential? How does this person pass background checks by the FBI and the Department of Justice?"

The district has now asked their legal counsel to ask the same questions.

In the meantime, the district told 10News that Kinloch will never set foot on the Wolf Canyon Elementary School campus again.

However, one of his first grade students is upset by that.

"He was like a really nice teacher," said first grader Christian Ferguson. "It felt really sad when he had to get, like, arrested."

Kinloch's arrest has parents in disbelief that a man with this kind of past was around children all day for the past 12 years, with eight years at Feaster Charter School and the past four at Wolf Canyon.

"It makes you wonder what the background process is overall," said parent Dennis Martinez.

Millican said, "We share with our parents that sense of outrage. We don't think this was right."

Kinloch was released last Friday on $100,000 bail. He is due to appear in court Dec. 7.

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