National Trust for Historic Preservation: 10 historic sites saved, 10 lost in 2013

The National Trust for Historic Preservation compiled a list of 10 historic preservation saves and losses from 2013.

10 Sites Saved:

- 1. Peavey Plaza, Minneapolis, Minn. — Preservationists persuaded the Minneapolis City Council to drop a demolition plan and undertake a rehabilitation plan instead.

- 2. Jensen-Byrd, Spokane, Wash. — Preservationists persuaded Washington State University to restore and reuse this 104-year-old former warehouse, rather than sell and demolish the structure.

- 3. Fort Monroe, Hampton, Va. — Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell approved a master plan to restore and revitalize this former military base.

- 4. Stamford Post Office, Stamford, Conn. — A federal court ruled against the sale and demolition plan for this historic post office. The ruling could help preservationists save historic post offices nationwide.

- 5. Montana's Upper Missouri River Breaks, Central Montana — The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit ruled the Bureau of Land Management violated laws protecting historic sites along this national monument.

- 6. Terminal Island, Port of Los Angeles — Vacant historic buildings at this former shipbuilding center from World War I and World War II could be saved under a plan approved by the Los Angeles Board of Harbor Commissioners.

- 7. Wrigley Field, Chicago — Earlier plans for massive renovations of this historic ballpark have been amended to address the concerns of preservationists.

- 8. Five National Monuments designated by President Barack Obama — Each site represents a diverse chapter in American history from the Native American and Latino communities of Rio Grande del Norte to the Underground Railroad and the Buffalo Soldiers of the Civil War.

- 9. New Orleans' Saenger Theatre — This historic 1920s movie house and performing arts space was severely damaged in Hurricane Katrina but reopened to the public in October after rehabilitation.

- 10. Waterfront, Charleston, S.C. — A federal court found the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers violated preservation laws when it approved the construction of new cruise ship terminals on the waterfront.

10 Sites Lost:

- 1. Prentice Women's Hospital, Chicago — After a long battle during which advocates urged preservation of the building, the way was cleared for the structure's demolition.

- 2. Cyclorama Center, Gettysburg, Pa. — The removal of the Cyclorama Center from the Gettysburg National Park is a loss for advocates of 20th century architecture, though it was supported by some preservationists under the grounds that it would improve the interpretation of the battlefield's history.

- 3. Chinese Hospital, San Francisco — Once the only medical facility available to the local Chinese community, the historic hospital was marked for demolition to make room for a new hospital center.

- 4. The Pagoda Palace Theater, San Francisco — The historic vaudeville theater and movie house was razed in 2013 after 20 years of vacancy and failed proposals for redevelopment.

- 5. World Port Terminal at John F. Kennedy International Airport, New York — Was listed among the 11 most-endangered historic sites. Delta Airlines began demolishing the jet-age structure and plans to turn it into an aircraft parking zone.

- 6. Univision Building, San Antonio, Texas — Demolition began in November of this 1955 site known as the birthplace of Spanish-language broadcasting, to make way for new apartments.

- 7. St. Nicholas Croatian Catholic Church, Pittsburgh, Pa. — The first Croatian parish in the Western Hemisphere was demolished after the diocese closed its doors in 2000.

- 8. Charleston County Public Library, Charleston, S.C. — A court case allowed demolition to proceed on this first racially integrated library, built with an open, contemporary design.

- 9. Hojack Swing Bridge, Rochester, N.Y. — The historic railroad bridge was demolished after a 10-year fight by preservationists.

- 10. Pompey's Pillar Vandalism and Government Shutdown — Nine days after the U.S. government shutdown began, this sandstone pillar marking the expedition of Lewis and Clark was vandalized with a new signature carved into the stone while no rangers were guarding the site.

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