Podcast

PODCAST: The Vicar of Baghdad refuses to fight

The Reverend Canon Andrew White leads  St. George’s Church , the last Anglican church in Iraq. He also runs a clinic that sees thousands of patients a month, and a food program that feeds hundreds every week – regardless of their beliefs or religious affiliation.

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Story

New study looks at parenting polarization

Parents with different political tastes stress different life values to their kids, according to a new survey from the Pew Research Center.  While there is enormous common ground, the differences shed some light on how society generates little liberals and conservatives.  

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What is DecodeDC?

DecodeDC has a broad mandate: to help Americans understand how crucial political issues affect everyday life. We do this by using every narrative tool we can – from straightforward analysis to podcasts to interactive graphics to video. We want to be a reliable, honest and, when appropriate, highly entertaining source of insight and explanation of Washington, D.C.'s people, culture, policies and politics, but mostly we want to be useful. 
Ellen Weiss
Ellen Weiss

Ellen is vice president and Washington bureau chief and has been on a mission to bring DecodeDC to the Scripps audience for almost a year.  She leads a bureau of 22 journalists who produce national investigative stories for TV, print and online and now, produce this blog. She spent almost 30 years at NPR, starting as a production assistant and eventually becoming the senior vice president of news.

Andrea Seabrook
Andrea Seabrook

Andrea, who joined Scripps News in the fall of 2013, is the founder of DecodeDC. She spent more than a decade at NPR where she was a long-time Congressional Correspondent.  She has a bachelor's degree from Earlham College, and worked and studied for several years in Mexico City. Seabrook even had a bit-part in the prime time telenovela,  Demasiado Corazon .

Dick Meyer
Dick Meyer

Dick is chief Washington correspondent for DecodeDC. An experienced writer, reporter and author, Meyer was executive producer for the BBC's news services in America, NPR's executive editor and editorial director of CBSNews.com. Meyer also wrote a book on American culture and politics,  Why We Hate Us: American Discontent in the New Millennium  (Crown Publishing/Random House, August 2008). 

Miranda Green
Miranda Green

Miranda is our "quick hits" reporter for the DecodeDC blog.  She came to us by way of the Daily Beast and Newsweek, Inside EPA and numerous internships including CBS News and PBS. She's a 2012 graduate of The George Washington University's School of Media and Public Affairs.

Marc Georges
Marc Georges

Marc is our multimedia producer, helping define our online visual storytelling for DecodeDC and for our investigative work. Marc worked at Mashable and the BBC, where he produced daily news packages for television and radio outlets across the BBC. He earned bachelor's degrees in philosophy and film and television production from New York University and received his master's at Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

Rachel Quester
Rachel Quester

Rachel joins the DecodeDC team as a multimedia assistant responsible for producing the weekly podcast. She is a 2013 graduate from the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Georgia.

Amarra Ghani
Amarra Ghani

Amarra Ghani is a multimedia assistant for DecodeDC. She also has worked with the USDA as a media specialist, and interned with NPR's Morning Edition and All Things Considered in the fall of 2013. She is a graduate of the University of North Carolina Asheville where she majored in mass communication.

Phil Pruitt
Phil Pruitt

Phil is the director of digital content for the Scripps Washington bureau. He served as senior politics editor for Yahoo News in D.C. and worked for  USA Today  and Gannett News Service. Phil was part of the Pulitzer Prize-winning team for Gannett that authored a series titled "Getting Away with Murder" that uncovered hundreds of child abuse-related deaths that were going undetected each year as a result of errors by coroners.